Category Archives: ***Top Stories***

Peak on Appennines Highest Massif in Italy to Be Named “John Paul’s Peak”

Various news sources report that a peak on the Gran Sasso is to be named “John Paul’s Peak” on May 18 — the Pope’s 85th birthday. The Gran Sasso is the highest massif in the Appennines range which runs along Italian peninsula. The articles do not give the specific coordinates of the peak to be named but report it is 2,424 metres (7,900 feet). There are several higher peaks on the massif including the highest 2,914 metre Corno Grande peak. The coordinates for Corno Grande is 42° 28′ N; 13° 34′ E
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Is New Mexico Going to Sue to Take Guadalupe Peak From Texas?

Texas/New Mexico/Oklahoma Tripoint on 103rd Meridian New Mexico may be in the process of suing to take Guadalupe Peak back from Texas. The New Mexico Senate voted 33-0 to sue Texas for return of 603,485 acres of land three miles east of its current border to what it says should be the correct border on the 103rd meridian. New Mexico maintains the border was the result of an 1859 surveyor mistake. The bill now goes to the House.
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Poles Upset Over Plan to Give Native Name Targangil to Australia’s Mount Kosciuszko

News.com.au reports that Poles are concerned over a proposal by New South Wales, Australia, to give the country’s highest point a native name. Officials said Mount Kosciuszko would still be the dominant name for the peak even if they add an Aboriginee name to it. Mount Kosciuszko was named by the Polish explorer Sir Paul Edmund de Strzelecki. Strzelecki and James MacArthur, who ascended the mountain together, decided to name it after the Polish freedom fighter General Tadeusz Kosciuszko. Tadeusz Kosciusko was a hero of the US War of Independence and the Polish Army Commander in Chief of a famous Polish uprising in the late 1700′s. The article did not give the new name however Wikipedia says the name is Targangil. There are numerous Google references to the name — especially a ski resort by the name in Australia’s Snowy Mountains.

$26.5MM Suit After Black Mountain Boulder Kills Toddler

The Washington Post reports Dennis and Cindy Davidson have filed a $26.5MM suit against the mining operators after a boulder fell from Black Mountain and killed their toddler Jeremy in their home in Appalachia, Virginia. The article there is increasing resistance to strip mining which had been the live blood of the region. Now more than one in four of Appalachia’s residents lives below the poverty line. The accident occured at 2:30 a.m. on Aug. 19, 2004, when an employee from A&G Coal Company was widening a road at Strip Number 13 pushed soil over a berm prompting the microwave size rock to fall 649 feet down the mountain. The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy fined A&G $15,000 (the maximum $5,000 penalty for three violations — negligence for doing the work at night above occupied dwellings and using an inexperienced bulldozer operator working without adequate lighting. The Department that the maximum fines be increased to $70,000 for each incident. The Davidsons would like this to be called “Jeremy’s Law.” Coal produces more than half the electricity generated in the United States. More coal-fired power plants have been announced in the last 12 months than in the previous 12 years, according to the National Mining Association.
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Update January 11, 2005
Mark S. in the forum notes that Penn-Virginia, owners of the Black Mountain highpoint, owns the mineral rights for the mine in question is part of the suit.