Category Archives: Hawaii

Dehydrated Girl Rescued in Heat at Hawaii Volcanos National Park

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (HI)
Shorthaul Rescue of Dehydrated Hiker

The park received a cell phone call via 911 reporting an unconscious girl on the switchbacks on the backcountry Kaaha trail below the Hilina Pali Road around 5:30 p.m. on Monday, March 7th. Rangers and Hawaii County FD paramedics responded. The 12-year-old girl was a member of a school group that had walked down a difficult trail during the heat of the day. Many in the group were out of water and had difficulty getting back up the hill. The girl was conscious but very weak when rangers arrived. One of the paramedics started an IV and rangers shorthauled her to a waiting ambulance. She was taken to Hilo Medical Center for treatment. [Submitted by Paul M. Ducasse, Chief Ranger]

Hawaii Gives Sets Maximum Fine for Illegal Manoa Falls Hikes

The Honlulu Advertiser reports the Hawaii Board of Land and Natural Resources handed a $2,500 maximum fine to Magnum Tickets & Tours for repeatedly taking customers to the Manoa Falls Trail without permits. The organization notes that your operators bring too many on the tours and does not pay for trail maintenance. The mile long trail is one of the five most popular hikes in the state because it is close to Waikiki and boasts a 100-foot waterfall. According to DLNR rules, a maximum of five 12-person groups a day can reserve a slot and take a tour group up to Manoa Falls, but the groups cannot hike on weekends or holidays.

NASA Seeks Help Identifying UFO Over Haleakala and Mauna Kea

The astronomy obsessed Hawaii is buzzing over a UFO over Mauna Kea and Haleakala on December 17, 2004. A moving image of the UFO (380K) was published as NASA’s photo of the day today (Feb. 8). Officials ruled out known satellites or aircraft. Current candidates include a known satellite that was somehow missed by heavens-above, a recently launched rocket, and a passing space rock. NASA has set up a ***VERY BUSY*** discussion thread to discuss it. One poster wrote: “What is truly bizarre is that this object is visible for a good 55 minutes at Haleakala and close to 30 minutes at Mauna Kea. Usually, satellites take a few dozen seconds or, at the most, a couple of minutes to cross the entire sky. “If this object is a satellite, it is either very slow moving or at a very high altitude. I checked all the possibilities at Heavens-Above and no satellite passes seem to fit this observation. It is also impossible to be a meteorite.” For what it is worth the 16-foot asteroid that passed in December flew between earth’s manmade satellites and the surface and was the second closest recorded approach in history. It appeared with virtually no warning. At the risk of giving a spoiler, the conensus on the board was that it was a satellite.

13,000 Earthquakes in Hawaii in 2004 (average is 10,000)

The Honolulu Advertiser reports that there were 13,000 earthquakes were recorded in 2004 by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, only three were greater than magnitude 4. The average is 10,000 but Observatory seismologist Paul Okubo said there were fewer moderate to large quakes in the past year. There were 4,228 quakes were magnitude 1.5 or greater, and only 79 were big enough to have been felt by Big Island residents. The three largest quakes of 2004 — none greater than 4.5 — occurred beneath Kilauea on Feb. 5, Oct. 11 and Oct. 12. The principal source of earthquakes are Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Lo’ihi, all active volcanoes. Lo’ihi, about 6 miles south of the Big Island and 2,000 feet deep, is the youngest. It is expected to rise above sea level sometime in the next few thousand years. The most recent big earthquake in Hawai’i occurred in 1975 when a magnitude 7.2 temblor shook the Big Island, causing a tsunami that killed two campers in Halape, Puna.
The article was prompted by a 3.6 quake this week between Waiki’i and the Mauna Kea summit at a depth of 13 miles. Books on earthquakes.

Mauna Kea With Snow at 10,000 Feet Braces for a Busy Weekend

The Star Bulletin reports two additional officers will be on Mauna Kea during the weekend following the big snows which are down the 10,000 foot level on the 13,796 foot mountain. Traditionally more than a thousand cars will visit after a snowstorm. The article notes windchills this week were -25 and winds clocked at 50 mph. Authorities are concerned that with 40 less oxygen than at sea level many of the visitors may not be prepared.

World’s Second Most Expensive Telescope Slated for Maui’s Haleakala

The Honolulu Advertiser reports that a deal has been finalized to build on Maui’s Haleakala the second most expensive telescope in the world. The $161 million Advanced Technology Solar Telescope will be the world’s largest optical solar telescope and was developed by the U.S. Solar Research Observatory. The $300 million Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea is on the most expensive. In addition to the Mees Solar Observatory, the Haleakala summit is home to the Air Force’s Advanced Electro-Optical System telescope; Japan’s 80-inch MAGNUM Telescope; the 80-inch Faulkes Telescope, devoted to education of students and teachers in Hawai’i and the United Kingdom; and the SOLAR-C, a 20-inch telescope and spectrograph developed to observe the sun’s activities and corona.

Subzero Temps/80 mph Winds Drop Foot of Snow on Mauna Kea

The Honolulu Star Bulletin reports that storms with subzero temperatures and 80 mph winds dumped 6 to 12 inches of snow on the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa summits prompting closing of the road. The storms also resulted in 30 foot waves on Oahu’s north coast and pushed a foot of sand onto the road leading into Kaena Point State Park

The American Observatory webpage has links to some dramatic webcams of the snow.

Mauna Kea link on Forum.

Po’ouli Bird Feared Extinct on Haleakala

The New York Times reports a bird, a po’ouli, the last known member of its genus and species, died in its cage on Maui on Nov. 26. The bird is a shy, nearly silent brown bird with a black face that lived on the upper slopes of the Haleakala volcano, climbing tree trunks and eating insects and snails. The species was not discovered until 1973, when it was already in a death spiral. In 30 years its numbers fell from a few dozen to three. The other two are feared dead.

Woman Seeks to Have Husband Declared Dead After He Didn’t Return from Hike in Volcano National Park

According to the Star Bulletin an Indiana woman is asking that her husband be declared legally dead after not apparently not returning from a hike in Volcano Lands National Park. Tamara Lynch filed a missing-person report with the Warrick County Police Department in Indiana in June.
By June 12, she was “extremely anxious and upset” about her estranged husband’s welfare, so she checked his answering machine using a code she knew from before the separation. On it were messages from the Royal Kona Resort asking when Lynch planned to check out and take care of his bill.
She supplied the information to police, who found out Lynch had flown to Hawaii, rented a car and checked into the hotel. Police found Lynch’s car at the Evansville, Ind., airport and learned that he had not used his June 6 return ticket.
Police on the Big Island entered Lynch’s hotel room and said he had left with some personal items.
Officials at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park found Lynch’s rental car in the park.
Lynch’s father, Robert Lynch of Norwalk, Ohio, told the Hawaii Tribune-Herald he refuses to participate in efforts to have his son declared dead.

http://starbulletin.com/2004/12/09/news/story10.html