Category Archives: Oceania

February 11, 2006 Linkage

State Highpoint News
Warm weather records broken on Mount Washington
Boston Globe – United States
MOUNT WASHINGTON, NH –Talk about a warm winter — it’s been raining on top of Mount Washington. Tim Markle, chief meteorologist …
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Steeper Murayama Kodo Trail Opens on Fuji

The Yomiuri Shimbun reports a new trail has opened on Fuji. The Murayama Kodo trail was the most popular route up the mountain until it fell into disuse in 1903, when an easier trail was opened. In 2002, the Tokyo-based Fujisan Club began clearing the trail. The new trail is a stark contrast to the modern method, whereby visitors travel to the fifth station–2,400 meters above sea level–and then ascend to the 3,776-meter summit along a relatively easy trail. Records show that the ancient trail was opened in the late Heian period (794-1192) as part of the rigorous training for yamabushi, ascetic Buddhist monks. The trail begins at Murayama Sengen Shrine, 500 meters above sea level. It served as the main trail until the middle of the Edo period (1603-1868), when a new route was opened.

Philippines To Re-Open Highest Mount Apo Via New Trails

Mindanews reports that the Philippines is planning in April to re-open the country’s highest point via new trails via the highlands of Magpet and Arakan in North Cotabato. Trails leading to Mt Apo were closed for several years due to desecration and garbage problems. Policies to protect the mountain from desecration are to be strictly enforced (although the article did state what they are).

Poles Upset Over Plan to Give Native Name Targangil to Australia’s Mount Kosciuszko

News.com.au reports that Poles are concerned over a proposal by New South Wales, Australia, to give the country’s highest point a native name. Officials said Mount Kosciuszko would still be the dominant name for the peak even if they add an Aboriginee name to it. Mount Kosciuszko was named by the Polish explorer Sir Paul Edmund de Strzelecki. Strzelecki and James MacArthur, who ascended the mountain together, decided to name it after the Polish freedom fighter General Tadeusz Kosciuszko. Tadeusz Kosciusko was a hero of the US War of Independence and the Polish Army Commander in Chief of a famous Polish uprising in the late 1700′s. The article did not give the new name however Wikipedia says the name is Targangil. There are numerous Google references to the name — especially a ski resort by the name in Australia’s Snowy Mountains.

Climber in Fatal Fall in 80th Birthday Attempt to Climb Mount Taranaki in New Zealand

Stuff reports Harold Henry Vernon attempting to celebrate his 80th birthday on top of Mount Taranaki in New Zealand fell to his death. The climber, who had been living in the US but was born in Wales, was reportedly ill-prepared for the ascent despite more than 50 years of climbing experience in New Zealand. He reportedly had attempted the mountain on four consecutive days prior to the accident but was beaten back by weather.

Study: 8.2% Chance of Getting Killed While Climbing In New Zealand

The New Zealand Herald reports a Christchurch forensic psychiatrist has rocked the climbing world by publishing a study saying you have an 8.2% chance of getting killed while climbing in New Zealand. Dr Erik Monasterio said the figure is based on four climbing deaths, including two guides, from among the 49 participants in the four-year study he was conducting. The participants were mostly experienced climbers tackling difficult routes. Ironically none of the four deaths occurred in the 2003/04 climbing season, a bad one for fatalities. Thirteen people died in the Mt Aspiring area and in Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park, including three guides and a client in an avalanche on Mt Tasman. In 2001, another study published in the journal calculated the fatality rate in the Aoraki/Mt Cook park was 1.87 deaths for every 1000 days spent climbing. A 1988 study estimated a death rate of 4.3 per cent for British climbers on peaks over 7000m – more than 3000m higher than Aoraki/Mt Cook.